commuter-essex.jpg
Essex-Delancey Subway station: F, J, M, Z
It just goes to show that not all vandalism need be done with spraypaint and drippy markers, elastic webs can also cause some chaos. Artist Jasmine Zimmerman is a nocturnal web slinger creating rubber band installations all over Manhattan with the hopes of entangling you in her stretchy art. A few nights ago she covered the entrances of the Essex street subway station and claims MTA workers appreciated her art even while being forced to climb through it to get to work. She has also ensnared bikers and joggers in Tompkins Square Park and altered countless routes. Some might deride her art as careless and dangerous, but we just think it’s fun. After the jump we provide more of her rubbery webs followed by her existential statement in full, all 524 words of it, detailing the project.


commuter-essex.jpg
Essex-Delanacy Subway station: F, J, M, Z
It just goes to show that not all vandalism need be done with spraypaint and drippy markers, elastic webs can also cause some chaos. Artist Jasmine Zimmerman is a nocturnal web slinger creating rubber band installations all over Manhattan with the hopes of entangling you in her stretchy art. A few nights ago she covered the entrances of the Essex street subway station and claims MTA workers appreciated her art even while being forced to climb through it to get to work. She has also ensnared bikers and joggers in Tompkins Square Park and altered countless routes. Some might deride her art as careless and dangerous, but we just think it’s fun. After the jump we provide more of her rubbery webs followed by her existential statement in full, all 524 words of it, detailing the project.
w-mta I.jpg
essexI.jpg
IMG_1899.jpg
IMG_1877.jpg
IMG_1770.jpg
IMG_1842.jpg
IMG_1225.jpg
200073677_19cfbd0ddb.jpg
Artist Statement:
I am doing rubber band installations in the streets of Manhattan. They are elastic webs for people to get caught in, as we are all weaved in a web with people that may initially appear to be unrelated, are usually later revealed to be connected.
We are all in the center of a web, that pushes and pulls us, that is multi-faceted to it’s surrounding connections, that may speed us up or slow us down, and that usually directs or redirects our path; which is what the web installations do to anyone that just happens to be there at the right time.
The installations alter urban traffic environments, such as crossing staircases or busy sidewalks on the streets of Manhattan, inviting the pedestrian to reinvent their path. They can be very visible or almost completely invisible, depending on how the light hits them, (which changes throughout the evening of course as the sun moves through the sky).
If they are not looking at what lies ahead, they may just run into them and get caught in the web. They will then become aware of the space that they’re dancing with to navigate through the city.
I am altering the space and time that one may take for granted or view as predictable. For example, if one takes the same route commuting to and from work at the same time everyday, and this action over time becomes predictable and repetitive, I am here with spontaneity to alter that space and time, so that it is now unpredictable. By adding a surprise to the space, or an obstacle (however optimistically one chooses to label it), I am providing an opportunity for a creative alteration in the pedestrian’s route, as well as a new awareness of the space that one is passing through. No longer able to walk straight down the sidewalk, the pedestrian now can choose how they would like to reinvent their interaction with the space. They may go under it, play the strings as an instrument, dance through elasticity wrapping it around their body, or simply walk around it via the street. Whatever way they choose, they are becoming a dancer in that moment. Being a dancer and installation artist, I’m interested in how the two can merge and initiate each other, while using the public space that is accessible by everyone.
I’m most interested in observing how the public interacts with the webs. I’ve been surprised at the positive, enthusiastic encouragement I get from the public as they’re watching (or helping) me install. I really expected to be bitterly yelled at or arrested. But people actually really love them and usually volunteer their help.
It’s even more interesting when I am a passerby and incognito in the space, some time after I’ve put one up. I’ve been told stories by people on the streets days after making a web, when there were just remnants hanging from a traffic light, that there was some crazy ‘Spiderman’ out, blocking the walkways with these giant webs, and that they didn’t know what the hell was going on. I responded with, “I don’t believe you, that’s crazy.”
Jasmine’s Flickr