Despite numerous theories about the Montauk Monster and an inability to properly identify it ”even with newly published photos many are convinced that it’s most likely some sort of creature from the clandestine animal experiment lab located on lovely Plum Island just off the coast of Orient Point. However, in an official statement to Associated Content, the Department of Homeland Security run facility emphatically denied it was theirs and even speculated that it’s most likely a “cat or raccoon” based on viewing the canine teeth from the widely dispersed photo. So today we reached out and they sent another explanation, that eliminated the feline theory, claiming it could actually be a “dog or raccoon.” They also maintain that “it’s impossible to accurately identify the species of animal from the photo. There is no scale from which to judge its size.” Are they not looking at the same photo we are? The above image clearly shows a fly—probably from the depths of Hell—feasting on the animal, providing some indicator of scale. You would think hope that an agency responsible for protecting livestock and specifically engaged in highly contagious animal experimentation would have all the information at hand. Then again, it is ran by Homeland Security. Official unaltered statement after the jump. UPDATE: new ‘Monster’ found in Connecticut within relative earshot of Plum Island.

“It is impossible to accurately identify the species of animal from the photo. There is no scale from which to judge its size. Additionally, when a body has had prolonged exposure to water and predators, it can be altered or appear different from its normal form. If we had the actual body, we could tell you what it is; however, from viewing the lower canine tooth and other physical characteristics evident in the picture, we could guess it may be a dog or raccoon. I can state categorically that it is not associated with the work performed at Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). PIADC serves as the Nation’s first line of defense against foreign animal diseases of livestock by identifying such diseases through diagnostic testing and by developing vaccines to protect livestock from those diseases.”

-Dr. Larry Barrett, Center Director, Plum Island Animal Disease Center.