Zuccotti Park is privately owned, but as part of a long standing agreement with the city, must remain open to the public 24 hours a day, and so far, that has created a gray area preventing an outright eviction of the Occupy Wall Street protesters.

However, it’s only a matter of time before the city starts figuring out how to exploit some legal loopholes and forces them out, a process Mayor Bloomberg said he’s already working on. So what other locations can demonstrators occupy?

According to the Associated Press, there’s a bunch of “bonus plazas,” up until now most people have referred them to as POPS or privately owned public spaces, that are available. There’s one right across the street and another that’s even owned by GM:

The closest one to Zuccotti Park is at 140 Broadway, notable for its modernist red cube designed by landscape architect Isamu Noguchi. There’s also the General Motors plaza on Fifth Avenue, home to the Apple store and its famous glass-cube structure. And there’s the McGraw-Hill Plaza near Times Square, where New Yorkers can enjoy free concerts in the summer.

Google-mapped for your convenience:
140 Broadway
General Motors plaza
McGraw-Hill Plaza
But that’s the short list. Visit NYC.gov to see the full gambit and plot accordingly.