The NY Civil Liberties Union released a report revealing that of the 882 students arrested in the 2011-12 school year by the NYPD, over 96 percent were black or Latino and 74% were male. One in four students arrested were between 11 and 14. Over the course of the 216-day high school year (and 209-day middle school year), an average of four students were arrested and seven students summoned every day. The Student Safety Act of 2011 requires the NYPD to submit quarterly reports to the City Council on arrests, summonses, and other police activity; the most popular charge for summonses at 64% was “disorderly conduct,” a catchall for many kinds of misbehavior, indicating that the NYPD is getting involved in non-criminal disciplinary action. As the NYCLU puts it:

“We can no longer ignore the impact that police practices have on perpetuating the achievement gap in our city’s schools,” NYCLU Advocacy Director Udi Ofer said. “We know that the Bloomberg administration cares deeply about closing the achievement gap. Yet, it’s about time that the administration face the facts and recognize that when a student gets ticketed or arrested in school for minor misbehavior, the student’s ability to succeed academically is greatly weakened. If we’re going to succeed in closing the achievement gap, then we need to invest more resources in proven alternatives to policing to handle student disciplinary problems.”

(Photo: stevendepolo/Flickr)

Update: We reported these stats yesterday, but it probably bears repeating. –Ed.