What happens to an arts and culture complex when military contractors move into the building? Ops-Core — makers of such fine protective killing accessories as the “Skull Crusher” – decided to turn the Boston Midway Studios’ theater into a combat helmet assembly plant. That didn’t go over well, so they called their neighbors “self delluted bullshiters and drama queens who use art as an excuse to justify and rationalize their pathetic existence.” That didn’t go over well, so, they tried another way. Meet your new neighborhood artists! Wink wink.

Hyperallergic reports that at a recent community meeting, Ops-Core changed their tune and tried really, really hard:

“Since our inception, we have been designing, sewing, and custom assembling protective products here with our other creative neighbors. Our work is no different than a fashion designer making a line of dresses, a ceramicist making bowls or dishes to sell, or a painter making multiple prints of a popular design. We consider our products to be works of art, and so do our customers. The processes that are required to make our products require the same type of space and creative atmosphere as other artist businesses in the community.”

But of course! Mass producing military equipment is exactly like making art. Because really, this not a helmet — it is a functional assemblage sculpture! And serving in the military is exactly like a piece of endurance performance art. Military raids in civilian territory? An exercise in relational aesthetics! “Incidents” of violence the President has to apologize for? Happenings.