While we wait for Curiosity’s software update to finish switching the rover from “flight mode” to “car mode,” industrious humans have put together some sweet rotating panoramas to play around with.

First up: photographer Andrew Bordov put this gem together from a plethora of Sol 2 (day 2, August 8th) photos and uploaded it to panorama site 360Cities.net.


Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 2 in New Mexico

Okay, it’s not completely pure–Bordov colored the images in Photoshop and created a sun he approximated from a 2005 photo by the Spirit rover– 360Cities founder Jeffrey Martin stands by Bordov’s efforts as totally accurate (“It is totally accurate — it is a wider-angle version of the existing photos put together,” Martin told TPM) and the closest anybody will get to a true Mars panorama until Curiosity beams back more color photos. Oh, and the New Mexico tag on the feature? That’s due to a glitch on 360Cities’ website, Bordov says: apparently, there’s no tag for a location outside Earth.

Honorable mention: The Wall Street Journal’s color and black-and-white panoramas, from Aug 9 photos.

We finish with a pitch for a Mars reality show–not starring our stalwart Curiosity (alas!), but actual humans on Mars. Dutch company Mars One wants to send brave folks to Mars…forever. Science’s big holdup with Mars exploration has been the logistical impossibility of storing enough fuel for a there-and-back-again trip, so Mars One’s brilliant solution is to leave folks on Mars and keep shipping folks over in seasons waves every two years. Say hello to interstellar fame, Marsonauts of the near future, and goodbye to any hope of rescue (especially if you pull some Real World shenanigans and annoy the American people into ignoring your exile on the Red Planet). How to pay for this venture? A media blitz, of course. Like having press write about…the campaign…Oh, just watch the pitch video already: