I was sitting in a Psych 101 class at a Missouri community college near Kansas City when the subject of Rush Limbaugh somehow came up.

One woman in her twenties spoke up. “Ugh, that guy is such a jerk. He was married to my sister.” Another woman gasped.

“You’re kidding me. He was married to my sister. He’s terrible.” We spent the rest of the class discussing how terrible Rush Limbaugh was as a human being.

This was nearly 15 years ago, so who knows if the women were telling the truth. (Although why make it up? And Limbaugh has been married four times.) But I relate the story only to make this point: even those of us born and raised in the Showme state aren’t unequivocally proud of Rush Limbaugh.

But while I’m certain there are plenty of Limbaugh fans in Missouri–I’ve gone to church with many of them–I’m disappointed in the Missouri legislature for commissioning a sculpted bust of the radio host Rush Limbaugh from St. Louis artist E. Spencer Schubert, a man who doesn’t just share the same retrograde beliefs so common to many in Missouri, but actively stirs up the sort of vile, backwards thinking that gives the midwest the all-too-often-deserved reputation of being home to close-minded, hateful hillbillies. (In truth, many hillbillies are quite open minded.)

It gets worse. The other inductee to the Hall of Famous Missourians this month? Dred Scott, the slave who sued for his own freedom, first brought his case before the circuit court in St. Louis in 1857. Of course, Scott lost the case, so perhaps that shameless incident in Missouri history is a better match for Limbaugh than I’d first considered. (Photo: Mark Hammermeister/flickr)