Over the weekend, Pussy Riot members Maria Alyokhina, 24, and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 22 were transferred to separate penal work colonies in Perm and Mordovia, far from Moscow. That is, allegedly. Nadya’s husband/“quasi con man” Pyotr Verzilov tweeted about it over the weekend, but he couldn’t confirm it with the authorities. Then, Pussy Riot’s lead lawyer Mark Feygin announced it today, but he couldn’t confirm it with his clients.

That’s right. The whereabouts of defendants of Russia’s highest profile case in decades cannot be officially confirmed. Outrageous. Or not, if you’ve been following the case.

More reliable is the fact that those prison camps in Perm and Mordovia “are cruelest camps of any that could have been chosen.” Right, Verzilov. This is old Soviet prison colony country right there.

Meanwhile, Katya Samutsevich — the third Pussy Riot member who radically changed her legal strategy at the last appeal and decided to finally point out to the court that she was kicked out of the church before the rest made it to dance to an anti-Putin song at the altar — is free. She is also exhausted from all the interviews.

The thirty-year-old computer programmer/Pussy Riot’s main feminist ideologue is currently filing a complaint regarding her own imprisonment to the European Court of Human Rights. Samutsevich is fighting for her collective’s members’ release, but the reality is starting to hit her as well and, without sans her balaclava and anonymity, she’s not sure if she will continue Putin indeed has tightened the screws:

“I’m only now beginning to understand what happened over the last seven months and to be honest I see that the situation has got a lot worse in Russia… I’d like to take part but at the same time I realise I have to be cautious. Now they could even be tailing me. Being active in the group is not defined only by taking part in performances.”