Tuesday was election day, and many things “changed,” while many things stayed the same. Voters had the chance to decide on legalizing weed in three states and one city-state. As of Wednesday, medical pot use is legal in 23 states and the District of Columbia, and 17 have moved to decriminalize the drug to varying degrees. Here’s the breakdown of who decided to legalize and how far they went with it:

Oregon: YES

Oregon legalized recreational use of weed for citizens over 21-years-old. Oregonians will be allowed up to one ounce of pot and six plants, while state commission will regulate sales and production. 90 days after the election has been certified, the state have 18 months to put regulations in place.

Alaska: YES

Alaska voted to allow anyone 21 years or older to possess up to one ounce of herb and six plants. Production and sales of ganja will be regulated by the state beginning 90 days after the election is certified. After that, the state will have 18 months to begin regulations.

Florida: NO

Florida was attempting to legalize medicinal weed and would’ve been the first southern state to do so, but no such luck this time around. Back in July, opposition to the measure began to really fire up and money flooded into advertising to sway voters. Florida also required a state constitutional amendment, and under those rules it would take 60% of the vote to pass. With 57% in favor, however, it does shows that the majority of Floridians wanted it, they were just three points shy of victory.

Washington, D.C.: YES

The city-state of Washington, D.C. has voted to decriminalize, but it’s not out of the woods yet. If implemented, adults 21 and over will be able to legally possess two ounces and six plants, but by law, voter measures cannot impact the D.C. budget, so sales and taxation of those sales are prohibited. More than 69% voters were in favor of decriminalization, but there’s still a huge hurdle to clear: Congress has to approve the measure, and the House and Senate are officially under Republican control now. Great job, America.

(Photo: Wikipedia)