In 2001, a medical student figured out how to make you cum at the push of a button. Now, fifteen years later, he’s still struggling to find interest in his discovery.

Stuart Meloy uncovered the magic touch while doing research on pain relief, but now hopes to use it to help women who have trouble climaxing. According to New Scientist, however, he’s been unable to raise the $6 million he estimates he’ll need for FDA approval testing, and volunteers have been hard to come by. That the process requires an electrode implant on the spine probably doesn’t help. New Scientist explains his foibles:

As of 2014, the massive media interest in the device has not translated into the $6 million that Meloy estimates would be needed to run a full trial.

Health insurers do not cover the cost of experimental treatments, and approval from regulators is needed to license the devices for treating a specific condition, such as sexual dysfunction. “Staging an FDA pivotal trial is a fairly expensive undertaking, and that takes money I don’t have right now,” Meloy says. “Though it would be nice to bring [the device] to fruition.”

The surgeon stumbled upon the treatment by accident. “I was placing the electrodes and suddenly the woman started exclaiming emphatically,” he said . “I asked her what was up and she said, ‘You’re going to have to teach my husband to do that’.”

True though it may be, there’s something self-congratulatory about that story that gives me a bad taste in my mouth about the whole enterprise. There’s also this quote Meloy gave back in 2001: “If young women of 15 or so are having painful operations to enlarge their breasts when they don’t have to, are you kidding? Of course it’ll be used.” Some women want bigger boobs, so it only follows that other women will want to experience the joys of surgically-induced remote-control ecstasy!

So far, anyway, it seems that very few people have lined up to prove Meloy right. Would you use it?

(Photo: dominantsoul)