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06.08.15 Liam Mathews

Everything has been bigger in Texas since before Texas even existed. A report published in the journal PLOS One (the only peer-reviewed journal with a name like a graffiti writer) shares results of a study of shark vertebrae found in the Duck Creek Formation, a rocky area outside of Fort Worth. Husband-and-wife paleontology team Joseph […]

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09.11.14 Sophie Weiner

Archeologists recently found out that Stonehenge was once a complete circle, destroying long held beliefs about the enigmatically placed stones. Now, there has been an even bigger discovery. Using high tech magnetometers — “advanced metal detectors — ground-penetrating radar, electromagnetic sensors and three-dimensional laser scanners,” scientists were able to peek beneath the ground surrounding the site for the first time. […]

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09.10.14 Sophie Weiner

Google Street View Egypt launched a new addition this week, giving internet users around the globe access to panoramic, 360 degree views of the Great Pyramids of Giza and other historical sites. Google can now add the Cairo Citadel, the necropolis of Saqqara and the Hanging Church to their list of documented monuments, which already featured the Colosseum, […]

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07.11.14 Sophie Weiner

The beloved 3,500-year-old Egyptian obelisk behind the Metropolitan Museum is undergoing a laser cleaning. Since its arrival in New York in 1880, the 69-foot-statue has collected quite a bit of dirt. It’s become difficult to see the many intricate hieroglyphs the statue is carved with. The Central Park Conservancy gave $500,000 to the cleaning project. In case you […]

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06.16.14 Sophie Weiner

A dig site at 50 Bowery has yielded some unexpected artifacts, including an 19th century “elixir of long life,” DNA Info reports. The site was once a German beer garden, and the elixir was found among other old alcohol bottles and remedies like “Dr. Hostetters Stomach Bitters.” Now, the archeologists are trying to recreate these allegedly life-extending drinks. […]

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05.21.14 Sophie Weiner

Adam Lowe, a British artist, has spent the last five years making a perfect replica of the tomb of Tutankhamun, one of the most famous archeological sites in the world. Thanks to advancement in 3D printing technology, Lowe was able to make a replica that simulates the real thing down to fractions of a millimeter. […]

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04.07.14 Marina Galperina

ANIMAL’s feature Artist’s Notebook asks artists to show us their original “idea sketch” next to a finished piece. This week, Brooklyn-based artist Clement Valla talks about a new series of images and sculptures based on explorations of archeological, archival and digital junk piles. His solo show “Surface Survey” opens at TRANSFER Gallery on April 19th. After my […]

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07.19.12 Marina Galperina

Archeologist Beatrix Nutz has uncovered a revolutionary loot of 600-year-old underwear at an Austrian castle. The dirty tattered linen bras and panties could just may well be “the missing link” in “the history of women’s underwear,” she says. Surprisingly, these soft bra pieces predated the corset and had little sown flower embellishments on them, which […]

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03.25.11 Marina Galperina

Archeologists found skeletal remains of a 260-million-year-old, dog-sized, short-snouted, saber-toothed leaf-cruncher. There are no serrations on the mammal-like reptile’s teeth so they’re calling it Tiarajudens eccentricus, “unusual tooth.” The weirdo beasts’ 5 inch fangs weren’t used for chewing but for sparing with each other over ferns, leaves, stems and Tiarajudens eccentricus pussy. Nature. […]

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01.20.11 Marina Galperina

The remains of the earliest confirmed domesticated dog in the Americas were found… in fossilized human shit. Well, times were hard back in the B.C. era. Sometimes, you had to eat your best friend or die. For your information, people that eat dogs poop orange-brown (Thanks, University of Maine!). […]

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