A Brooklyn man received a ticket in February for moving between subway cars while the train was in motion to escape another man urinating in the car. Now he’s going all the way to Brooklyn Supreme Court to fight the $75 charge, DNAinfo reports.

On February 17, Michael Kneitel was stopped and ticketed by an officer in the Jay Street station while moving between cars on an F train in order to get away from a man peeing. The MTA’s Transit Adjudication Bureau recently ruled against Kneitel, so on April 13 he filed a petition in Brooklyn Supreme Court to have the ruling thrown out.

“I’m going to stand up to the MTA and say, ‘You know what? You messed up,’” he said. “I’m going to take this ruling and stick it so far up their a-hole until it reaches the back of their teeth.”

Kneitel says that his proximity to urine constituted enough of an emergency to justify passing through doors, which is normally a violation except during an emergency. He had a bacterial infection in his heart a few years ago that required surgery, and his doctor ordered him to stay away from any potentially hazardous liquid, such as train urine.

It may seem odd to go through this much trouble to dispute a $75 fine, but the DNAinfo story goes out of its way to depict Michael Kneitel as a crazy dude. Here’s the first sentence:

An auto mechanic who collected Nazi memorabilia and was once busted for firing a pistol at a picture of his mother-in-law has become an unlikely champion of the right for straphangers to flee pee in a subway car.

Yes, Michael Kneitel was once caught taking target practice using a photo of his former mother-in-law in a Brooklyn park, and also had a cache of Nazi memorabilia that he had because it was “valuable.”

Shine on, Michael Kneitel, you crazy pee-soaked Nazi diamond.

(Photo: The All-Nite Images)