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10.08.14 Marina Galperina

OccultUs is a new project from ECAL/Simon de Diesbach for Oculus Rift featuring live sound created by a variety of physical contraptions and rigs. Users find themselves at the core of a hybrid space, where images and sound, though originating in heterogeneous realities, coincide. Stuck between two worlds, their perception is challenged. The OccultUs experience requests users’ participation in a […]

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05.30.14 Andy Cush

Over the past few years, we’ve seen several devices that use sound waves to make small objects levitate. Now, the University of Tokyo researchers who created of one such system have taken the concept a step further, using projection-mapping to illuminate particles as they float in midair. The idea is easier to understand once you […]

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05.13.14 Sophie Weiner

Russian sound artist Dmitry Morozov aka ::vtol:: has transformed a dulcimer-like Russian folk instrument into a self-playing robotic device. The instrument can either generate sounds through an algorithm or by reading brainwaves with an EEG headset. Morozov’s brain sounds quite avant garde. ::vtol:: has previously created a device that turns an encoded tattoo into noise, an umbrella that acts as a personal […]

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01.02.14 Andy Cush

In the above video, researchers from the University of Tokyo use sound to make small particles hover in mid-air, a scientific magic trick that’s been done before but remains no less wonderful. Researcher Yoichi Ochiai explains on his website: It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound […]

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10.21.13 Andy Cush

On Kickstarter, a group of audio engineers from Queens is taking a novel approach to the documenting and preserving of old buildings: capturing their sound. Not simply the sounds of the things that happen inside, like leaky old pipes or wind rustling through broken windows, but the sound of the buildings themselves. Rooms have unique […]

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07.16.13 Andy Cush

Before we get into this, it’s helpful to remember how sound works. An object vibrates at a particular frequency, which causes the air molecules around it to vibrate at the same frequency. Those air molecules bump into other air molecules, causing them to vibrate at that same frequency, and so on and so on, until some […]

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06.07.13 Julia Dawidowicz

Bringing life to 18th-century physicist Ernst Chladni’s famous Plate Experiment, YouTuber Brusspup demonstrates incredible geometric patterns that form when sand is placed on a metal plate attached to a “tone generator.” This art-meets-science video really resonates with us. Here’s how it works: As the frequencies coming through the speakers increase, so do the plate’s vibrations. The sand gravitates towards the least-vibrating areas, […]

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03.12.13 Andy Cush

The options for visualizing sound are manifold, but there’s something appealing about the analog physicality of this piece from Italian art collective CaCO3. The work, entitled 80 mesh – la forma del suono (the shape of sound), uses three metal plates covered in fine sand, onto which the frequencies from three vintage electronic instruments called Ondes Martenots are […]

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12.27.12 Andy Cush

German sound artist Derek Holzer has created the Christmas gift I wish I’d asked for: a beautiful, wooden analog synthesizer that’s controlled by light and a hand-cranked wheel. Holzer’s Tonewheels Hurdy-Gurdy (the name is a reference to this equally magical medieval folk instrument) uses no digital technology of any kind, relying exclusively on electronic oscillators […]

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05.30.12 Joshua Rivera

Multimedia designer Yiruo Zhao made this sonic exploration of Fifth Avenue from 125th Street to Washington Square Park. Recording audio every four streets, Zhao sketches out a distinct aural portrait of each neighborhood along Fifth. […]

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