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07.07.15 Liam Mathews

In the Pine Barrens of New Jersey, a wooded land somewhere between New York City and Philadelphia, scientists confirmed the existence of a previously undiscovered species of leafhopper, a type of colorful sap-eating bug that lives in a threatened grass called pinebarren smokegrass, EurekAlert reports. The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal ZooKeys, was led […]

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04.02.15 Prachi Gupta

Ants that live in Manhattan have developed a taste for human food — more so than ants found in forests and parks, a new study has found. Researchers from NC State say that the Pavement ant, the most common ant in New York City, eats junk food that we toss out. Several of the 21 […]

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12.02.14 Prachi Gupta

A new study about New York’s abundant wildlife has found that bugs are competing with rats for scraps of our food. It’s the “half glass full” scenario for any New Yorker, offering promising news if you hate rats, or, if you’re cynical, confirming the belief that the city is filthy and overrun by more critters […]

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10.28.14 Backdoor Pharmacist

Humans seem to have a thing against bugs, spiders, centipedes, insects. Some people may argue we should eat them, but in the meantime, the only bug I want to see near my food is a bee on the side of a honey jar. And that’s where we exactly where we begin: HALLUCINOGENIC OR MAD HONEY […]

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09.04.14 Marina Galperina

From the YouTube channel that brought us gloriously swinging scrotum and BHQF’s “how to” art, here’s a “Bugz” from Berlin-based Low Concept. MOCAtv explains that Low Concept is a joint Ville Haimala (Renaissance Man, Millennium) and Daniel Fisher (Physical Therapy) “attempt to make literally low concept, functional music for the dancefloor.” What’s the roaches? Why is one of […]

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05.30.14 Andy Cush

In a post about the manifold functions of trichomes in plant life, Anna Tiley at Science Says reveals this nugget of information: Some of the best known examples of trichomes are found on cannabis plants. The function of these was recently explained in a talk at the Society of Biology by GW Pharmaceuticals’ Director of Botanical Research […]

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05.07.14 Sophie Weiner

A new species of wasp discovered in Thailand in 2008 were finally given a name: Ampulex dementor, a tribute to J.K. Rowling’s Dementors, the most depressing monsters of all time. The wasps have been called “soul sucking,” as their preferred method of reproduction involves stinging a cockroach to place it in a “docile” state while […]

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12.09.13 Andy Cush

The AP is reporting that a cockroach species that’s never before been seen in the U.S. has been spotted on the High Line. Entomologists say it’s not a cause for great concern, but one of Periplaneta japonica’s attributes stands out: unlike ordinary NYC roaches, it can survive in freezing cold. “There has been some confirmation that it […]

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11.25.13 Marina Galperina

ANIMAL’s feature Artist’s Notebook asks artists to show us their original “idea sketch” next to a finished piece. This week, Dublin-based artist Zoetica Ebb talks about her Alien Botany drawing series inspired by a Joris-Karl Huysmans’ 1884 novel À rebours, and her intensive visual catalog of bizarre plants and insects. Alien Botany is a series of concept drawings based around the idea of […]

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07.24.13 Andy Cush

Possibly more relevant to your life than the Starbucks map: a regularly updated cockroach map of NYC’s zip codes first launched in 2010, based on how many roaches are turned up by restaurant inspectors in a given week. This week, 10473, encompassing Clason Point, Shore Haven, and Castle Hill in the Bronx is the worst, and […]

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